HIV Services

Home > Our Services > HIV Services

Call us today!

Sioux City

(712) 252-2477

Sioux City

(712) 252-2477

South Sioux City

(402) 412-7242

South Sioux City

(402) 412-7242

Dental

(712) 226-9089

Dental

(712) 226-9089

Pharmacy

(712) 226-9429

Pharmacy

(712) 226-9429

Medical Billing

(712) 226-9240

Medical Billing

(712) 226-9240

Dental Billing

(712) 226-9236

Dental Billing

(712) 226-9236

HIV Treatment & PrEP

HIV OutreachHIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It weakens a person’s immune system by destroying important cells that fight disease and infection. There is currently no effective cure for HIV, but with proper medical care, HIV can be treated.

Siouxland Community Health Center provides HIV counseling and testing in all languages. All HIV testing and education services are offered free of charge. Testing is available Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Walk-ins are welcome during this time. You do not need to have an appointment. If after hours testing is needed, please call 712‑226‑8973 to make an appointment.

If you are looking for testing outside of the Health Center, please click here to view our outreach calendar or call 712‑226‑8973 to enquire about testing events or to set up testing.

Siouxland Community Health Center provides free condoms, safer sex supplies, and wound care kits. Please call 712‑226‑8973 to schedule a time to pick up supplies or walk in Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

The CDC recommends everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 get tested for HIV at least once.

Our HIV Medical Care Team

We know that managing a chronic disease can be tough, but our team is ready to help. Siouxland Community Health Center’s HIV medical care team includes two HIV Specialists and three other providers treating HIV. The HIV department also includes nurses, case managers, prevention specialists and a benefit specialist. Our goal is to partner with you to achieve and maintain good health.

To make an appointment or speak to one of our team members confidentially, please call 712-226-8973.

HIV Testing

hiv servicesPeople at higher risk should get tested more often. If you were HIV-negative the last time you were tested, the test was more than one year ago, and you can answer yes to any of the following questions, then you should get an HIV test as soon as possible:

  • Are you a man who has had sex with another man?
  • Have you had sex—anal or vaginal—with a partner who has HIV?
  • Have you had more than one sex partner since your last HIV test?
  • Have you injected drugs and shared needles, syringes, or other drug injection equipment (for example, cookers) with others?
  • Have you exchanged sex for drugs or money or a place to stay?
  • Have you been diagnosed with or treated for another sexually transmitted disease?
  • Have you been diagnosed with or treated for hepatitis or tuberculosis (TB)?
  • Have you had sex with someone who could answer yes to any of the above questions or someone whose sexual history you don’t know?

You should be tested at least once a year and may benefit from more frequent testing if you answer yes to any of the above questions. Please call 712-226-8973 with any questions, for condoms and safer sex supplies and/or for testing.

For more information, visit the CDC website.

PrEP

What is PrEP?

Pre–Exposure Prophylaxis, or PrEP, is the method of taking an HIV medication daily to prevent getting infected with HIV.

Studies show that PrEP is up to 99% effective when taken every single day. PrEP is another way to reduce your risk for HIV, along with talking about your status with your partners and consistently using condoms and lube.

Is PrEP right for me?

PrEP may be a good option if you want an effective way to prevent HIV transmission and add more peace of mind to your life. PrEP is best for times in your life when you are at higher risk for HIV, such as when you are having sex with multiple partners, are part of an open relationship, have a recent STI/STD diagnosis, or have an HIV+ sex or injection partner.

How do I pay for PrEP?

For individuals who are under-insured or who are worried they may not be able to afford the medication co-pays, Gilead provides both a patient assistance program and a medication co-pay card to help cover the cost of PrEP. For more information, visit: https://www.gileadadvancingaccess.com/financial-support or call 712-226-8973 for more information.

Being on PrEP doesn’t just mean taking a pill. PrEP is part of a prevention program involving taking medication every day and being screened for HIV and other STIs/STDs regularly. PrEP only protects against HIV. It does not prevent herpes, syphilis, any other STIs/STDs, or pregnancy.

Before being prescribed PrEP, you will need to be seen by a medical provider and receive HIV and other lab tests.

Want to get PrEP?

For more information, or to schedule an appointment, please call 712-226-8973.

What is U=U?

U=U stands for: Undetectable = Untransmittable. It means that someone with an
undetectable HIV viral load on Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) cannot transmit HIV.

What does U=U involve?

This protection from ART depends on:

  • Taking ART every day
  • Having undetectable viral load for at least 6 months
  • Continuing to take your meds every day

Click here to learn more about PrEP 

  • PrEPIowa.org: PrEP Iowa houses resources for providers and consumers related to pre and post-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP and nPEP). This website also has information on Iowa’s TelePrEP program – which provides PrEP care directly to patients using telemedicine.
  • Stop HIV Iowa: Iowa’s newest website provides information related to FREE HIV testing, prevention, and care services throughout the state.

Resources for Iowa Guys

The Gay Men’s Health Committee, an ad hoc committee of the Iowa Department of Public Health‘s Community Planning Group; has compiled a directory for Gay & Bi-Sexual Men living in Iowa to use when looking for the health resources* they may need.

www.iowaguys.wix.com/resources

*These resources are not screened, and therefore, no guarantees can be offered concerning the quality of services; however the hope is that these resources are much more likely to be culturally competent in working with gay and bi men in Iowa.

+